The Whitworths of Arizona, bringing science to you in everyday language.

Friday, May 20, 2016

A Quick Way to Know if LBD is Likely

It is not unusual for a person to receive several diagnoses before they are finally diagnosed with Lewy body dementia (LBD), resulting in months, and sometimes, years between recognition of a problem and a diagnosis that fits. Primary doctors still may not recognize the cardinal differences between LBD and Alzheimer's. Even some neurologists aren't up to date on this disease, which Dr. James Galvin calls "the most common disease you've never heard of." Dr. Galvin has been working with LBD for a very long time. He was already a known expert on the subject when he joined Jim (Whitworth) on the LBDA board in 2008. We were honored when he offered to write the back page review of our book, A Caregiver's Guide to Lewy Body Dementia, published in 2010.

After these many years of research combined with clinical practice, Dr. Galvin has come up a very simple, but surprisingly accurate, list of ten questions that help physicians discriminate between Alzheimer's and LBD. When compared to standard tests, Galvin's diagnostic test shows the difference between Alzheimer's and LBD with a whopping 98.6% accuracy. Even imaging tests seldom do that well!

Dr. Galvin warns that a screening test, in itself, is insufficient for dementia diagnosis, but says that this test can suggest a strong possibility that LBD is present. The beauty of this test is that anyone can do it, including caregivers. While a formal diagnosis of LBD should always be done by a qualified physician, this test can provide a caregiver with information to take to the doctor and a basis for questions to ask. And hopefully, it will decrease the time before an accurate diagnosis.

The Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis Questionnaire

Allow 1 point for each of the following that has occurred at least three times over the past six months?
  1. Have slowness in initiating and maintaining movement or have frequent hesitations or pauses during movement?
  2. Have rigidity (with or without cogwheeling) on passive range of motion in any of the 4 extremities?
  3. Have a loss of postural stability (balance) with or without frequent falls?
  4. Have a tremor at rest in any of the 4 extremities or head?
  5. Have excessive daytime sleepiness and/or seem drowsy and lethargic when awake?
  6. Have episodes of illogical thinking or incoherent, random thoughts?
  7. Have frequent staring spells or periods of blank looks?
  8. Have visual hallucinations (see things not really there)?
  9. Appear to act out his/her dreams (kick, punch, thrash, shout or scream)?
  10. Have orthostatic hypotension or other signs of autonomic insufficiency?
Add up your score. A total of three or more points indicates a very high likelihood of Lewy Body Dementia.

Copyright 2015 The Lewy Body Composite Risk Score, James E. Galvin

If you do this at home and take it to your doctor, consider bringing along your journal with dates and descriptions of events such as hallucinations, to support your answers.

Some of the words in this test are fairly clinical--it's for doctors after all. Here are some definitions:
  • rigidity: Stiff or inflexible muscles
  • cogwheeling: a tremor that accompanies rigidity, usually characterized by a "stop and go effect" during range of motion
  • tremor at rest: a tremor that appears only when the extremity is not being used.
  • passive range of motion: when a person's extremities are moved through range of motion exercises by another person.
  • letharagic: sluggish, apathetic
  • incoherent: unclear, confusing, disjointed
  • orthostatic hypotension: low blood pressure on rising
  • autonomic insufficiency: ineffective functioning of one's automatic functions including digestion and elimination
For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.

Friday, May 13, 2016

When You Have To Go To The Emergency Room

This week, Timothy Hudson is our guest blogger again. (Yes, HUDSON, not Hutton. Sorry, Timothy about the typo last week!) He is caregiver for his parents, one of which has LBD, often posts on the Facebook Lewy Body Carers site and operates a website that is worth bookmarking. See what he says about it at the end of this blog.

Last week's blog was the first part of Timothy Hutton's great suggestions for hospital emergency room (ER) visits. If you haven't read it yet, be sure to read it before you read this. This week is simply a list of all the things you need when you do have to take a loved one to the ER. As I read it, I realized that almost every item could be a blog in and of itself! But Timothy's goal was to make a thorough, but short as possible list that carers could refer to and use. I think he succeeded!
  1. Accompany LO unless impossible. Travel in ambulance with LO. Arrange return-trip later (make a standing arrangement in advance, if possible)
  2. Bring your hospital kit ready with baseline notes, medications, clothes, phone AND charger, pen, paper, contact list, money, etc
  3. Stay with them in Emergency Room, and if they are admitted.
  4. Rigourously attend to hygiene: MRSI and C-Diff, etc., are potential killers, and can frequently be avoided. Apply even greater rigour for yourself. Disinfect, wear a mask, etc.
  5. Provide frequent close physical contact with your loved one to provide comfort, continuity and connection, reassure frequently, apologize and promise to do what you can to remedy (even if that is overly optimistic).
  6. If Trauma: advocate for sedatives and local anesthetics. Avoid general anesthetics.
  7. Pain medications: use Tylenol whenever possible rather than opiates.
  8. Ask early if the situation could be managed as an out-patient: inform staff that risks and downsides increase the longer you stay.
  9. Try to prevent hospital-induced delirium as much as possible. Try to recognize the difference between their dementia, a Lewy swing, and the onset of delirium.
  10. Ask for a quiet place, and try to keep LO and staff calm.
  11. Open or close door/drape depending on LO’s preference and reactions.
  12. Ask for alert-sounds from equipment in room to be silenced or quieter. This is usually done easily, but is rarely offered.
  13. Use “noise-cancelling” headphones and play something they like: they can be comfortable, will diminish the chaotic racket and be peaceful, if headphones tolerated.
  14. Bring something of interest to occupy your loved one.
  15. Quickly establish that they need to maintain medication schedule or a decline and difficult behaviours will likely emerge.
  16. Bring 24hrs of medications, pre-made in dosettes. Even if they will not allow your medications to be used (some will), the sooner you can administer them once discharged, the better (possibly as soon as you get out the door of the hospital).
  17. Advise them that persons with Lewy Bodies commonly have severe neuroleptic sensitivity. Avoid traditional anti-psychotics whenever possible.
  18. Accompany LO to all tests. Both as an advocate, and to ensure Showtiming doesn’t convince the technicians that LO is fine, or can stand/walk, or is not who they believe ‘em to be
  19. Request a paid-carer if you have to be away, depending on LO’s cognition. Some hospitals will have “sitters” that will be assigned without you having to pay for it (but they’ll never advise you of that, and they are frequently clueless about dealing with dementia and delirium).
  20. Always insist that someone help in the bathroom to prevent falls.
  21. If discharge is a potential, ask for details of what risk factors would be if you returned home.
  22. Carefully make notes, and ask for things to watch for once discharged.
  23. Carefully read the discharge instructions before you leave, digest the details, and ask questions while still at hospital with knowledgeable people available.
  24. Get them home as soon as viable – often will recover faster there.
  25. Don’t underestimate recovery times and relapse potential: almost always more difficult with LBD.
Thank you, Timothy, for sharing this. You will be able to find Timothy's complete article on the LBD Care Partner's page within a few weeks. (We are revamping the website to meet Googles mobile requirements or it would be sooner...)
Timothy Hudson operates LewyBodyDementia.ca -- a Canadian website providing tips and techniques to make life better for LBD carers and those they care for. Information is prioritized to provide the biggest benefit, and as early as possible in the process.

For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

 Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. (Nor is Timothy Hudson.) As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Before You Go To The Hospital Emergency Room

Our guest writer this week and next is Timothy Hutton, who is caregiver for his parents, one of which has LBD, often posts on the Facebook Lewy Body Carers site and operates a website that is worth bookmarking. See what he says about his website at the end of this blog. This week Timothy identifies what you need to do before deciding to take a loved one to the ER. Next week the second half of his article will discuss actually going to the ER.

LBD has extremely wide, gut-wrenching fluctuations – it is difficult to know if some things are a Lewy spike, or a potential coffin spike. How can you know?

Making the decision to go to a hospital emergency room (ER) is difficult, and frequently results from a worrisome change or crisis. Often, it is highly influenced by emotions. Using a baseline journal will help make a more objective decision, and will help with decisions when you are at the hospital.

Before a Crisis Hits: Consider, Plan and Discuss.

Consider the bigger picture. Think about the options and weigh the benefits of going to the ER. Consider the impact on your loved one: the potential for contracting another illness while there; how long it will take to be seen, assessed and treated; whether there is a possibility for worsening of the condition by being there; whether you can accompany them and how you will get back; and what your realistic expectations are of a cure.

Discuss and plan for likely future scenarios. Understand options and potential outcomes. For example, the success rate of resuscitating an elderly person with chronic conditions can be close to zero, and CPR and related processes can be extremely intrusive and traumatic. Would your loved one want that? Is quality of life more important than length? What happens if resuscitation is successful, but the condition is profoundly worse than before? What would you wish for if you were in their shoes?

If you think through those types of considerations, some of your decisions can be pre-made, or at least pre-weighed. You will also have had the time to investigate options and get supports in place to make either choice workable.

You will still have to make the final ER-trip decision, and this article provides two streams. One includes specific points to help make the decision. The second section explores what to do if you decide to go, what to take, what to do while your loved one is in the ER, and what to do afterwards -- whether you are discharged or not.

Do You REALLY Need to Go to The Hospital ER?First: Keep calm. Breathe. Your own agitation can magnify problem, make LO worse or less communicative.
  1. Weigh out the impacts vs. potential benefit of going. Avoiding the hospital can sometimes be the healthy choice.Lewy-speech and communication is often compromised – if symptom is being described, can you assess it yourself? 
  2. Listen carefully, be open, dismiss your own preconceptions, reflect to your LO, reinterpret, repeat.
  3. Check for obvious possibilities first (UTI, infection, dehydration, respiration, constipation). Can you set up something with your General Practitioner to provide you with sample jars to make it simpler for you to bring in a specimen for testing, or get over-the-counter UTI tests?
  4. Have a list of key contact people with phone numbers that you can call to consult. Have this with you at all times (electronic or printed, both is best).
  5. Is there a house-call doctor option available? Telehealth? The cost may be worth it for the lowering of disruption and exposure to hospital environment.
  6. Have plans, and have alternates: techniques to get off the floor if fallen, someone to call in emergency to help or check on the home. Instead of 911, there may be a local, non-emergency, number you can call to have firefighters come to get a person up from the floor.
Next week: More Timothy Hutton: When You Have To Go To The ER.

Timothy Hudson operates LewyBodyDementia.ca -- a Canadian website providing tips and techniques to make life better for LBD carers and those they care for. Information is prioritized to provide the biggest benefit, and as early as possible in the process.

For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

 Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. (Nor is Timothy Hutton.) As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.

Friday, April 29, 2016

LBD and Non-Drug Pain Relief

Last October's four blogs reviewed variety of pain-relieving drugs and found most of them to be lacking where LBD is concerned, and actually for the elderly in general. So what's the answer? Live with it? Hardly. Pain makes LBD symptoms worse and we surly don't want that. But there are some options. None of them are as easy as taking a pill, and it will probably take you a while to discover which one works best for you and your loved one.

Heat...and cold. Apply a heating pad to the painful area for about 20 minutes at a time. Even better, alternate heat and cold treatments, with a few hours between each application. Cold compresses should be icy cold, with a cloth buffer between the compress and the skin. Leave it on for no more than 15 minutes. Allow at least an hour between each application.

Physical remedies:

Stretching exercises. This is my favorite and I find it especially good for arthritic pain. I stretch my legs, arms and back (individually) as far as I can, relax and stretch again for at least ten times. It usually hurts at first, but whatever I'm stretching tends to feel better the more I stretch. If it hurts more instead of less, stop. I find that by the time I'm done, I can move much more easily and I have less pain. This works best when you do it yourself, but you can also help another person, such as your loved one, stretch.

Exercise. The more a person exercises, the better their body can handle pain. Be sure to choose a type of exercise that is supportive of your body. For instance, running isn't the best for a big-busted woman...or someone with artificial knees, but water exercises work well for just about anyone.

Physical therapy. This teaches exercises that help to improve movement and strength. It is especially helpful with reduced activity levels or a decreased exercise tolerance. A physical therapist will know just which muscles to move to provide the best pain relief for a specific situation.

Occupational therapy. This helps people to find less painful ways to perform activities of daily living.

Acupuncture and acupressure. These can provide temporary pain relief from conditions such as arthritis. Acupuncture requires a trained professional but caregivers can learn basic acupressure techniques.

Massage. This may help relax tight muscles and decrease pain. Use a few drops of soothing essential oils with this to increase its effects. This can also be a wonderful together time of touching and gentle talking. You could even add some guided relaxation as you massage. (See below for essential oils and guided relaxation.)

Other ideas:

Music. This helps to increase energy levels and improve mood. It may trigger the release of endorphins, natural pain reducing chemicals.

Laughter. Laughing and even smiling helps you let go of stress, anger, fear, depression, and hopelessness, all of which increase pain.

Guided relaxation. Gently talk to your loved one, telling them to think of something you know would be especially calming for them. You can find scripts for this at Inner Health Studio.

Essential oils. The five most mentioned oils for pain relief are wintergreen, spruce, lavender, marjoram and sandalwood. Go to organicfacts.net for more about each one of these and how they can be used. This site lacks an index but you can enter the oil in the search box to find it more easily. Add a few drops to a diffuser for aromatherapy, or to coconut oil for massage. Be aware that some oils, lavender in particular, may have an opposite effect if you make it too strong.
https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/essential-oils/list-of-essential-oils.html

Aromatherapy. This is the use of essential oils diffused into the air. It is one of the easiest ways to use these oils.

For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.

Saturday, April 23, 2016

Guilt, Worry and Anger

These three negative emotions cause caregivers--and your loved ones--a lot of pain and stress. In recent blogs, Mary, George's caregiver, has been learning how to deal with negative emotions. But these three, guilt, worry and anger still trip her up...a lot.

Guilt

Feeling guilt is how people try to control the past. Mary can't change that she was impatient with George, but she can at least, feel guilty it. Mary's brain accepts this as an immediate solution, but it doesn't accomplish anything and so this triggers more guilt. This adds stress, so that Mary will likely be even more impatient in the future. To deal with guilt,
  • As with any other negative feeling, recognize your feelings of guilt and put them into words. And then LET THEM GO. Consider guilt a toxic feeling that you don't want hanging around.
  • Look for the underlying feelings. Guilt is a "secondary feeling." That is, it is usually a response to other feelings like resentment or fear or feeling inadequate. Recognize these and put them into words too.
  • Be compassionate with yourself. You are human and you have a very stressful job. Give yourself the same consideration you'd give someone else in your position.
  • Align your future behavior with your values. While you can't change what has already happened, you can set yourself up to behave differently in the future. For instance, if you made a commitment to make weekly contact with your daughter but have been letting it slide, set up a special time and put it on your calendar.
  • Ask for help. A lot of caregiver guilt comes from feeling you should be able to do it all. You can't. Caregiving is not a single person job. Call a friend or relative to come "visit" with your loved one while you take some "me time." Hire help for a few hours a week, or more if you need it. This is money well spent.
  • Accept that taking care of yourself is "being a good caregiver." A loved one with a happy, healthy caregiver has less stress, and is happier and safer.
Worry

Mary used to worry a lot. That's how she tried to control a future that felt uncontrollable. Like guilt, worry is a temporary fix but adds stress because it doesn't actually accomplish anything. To deal with worry,
  • As with guilt, put feelings of worry into words, and then let them go.
  • Look the underlying feelings. Worry is another secondary feeling, often following feelings of fear and uncertainty. Turn these into words too.
  • Think about what you can do. Make a list things you can actually do to change a situation. Thinks like asking for help or going to a support group. Then follow through.
  • Once you've done what you can, let it go. If this is difficult, set a timer and allow yourself to worry of 5 minutes. Then move on.
Anger

This is a feeling that Mary often buries under guilt and worry. But it too, is a secondary feeling, which usually follows emotions like frustration, inadequacy and fear. When Mary can't do anything else about it, she can at least feel angry. As with the other feelings, feeling angry is a temporary fix that doesn't solve anything...and often makes matters worse. Unlike guilt and worry, both of which can be immobilizing, anger tends to move Mary into action, resulting in words or behaviors that she may regret later. Therefore, the first step for dealing with anger is to learn how to express it in constructive ways--or avoid expressing it.
  • Get enough rest and take care of your health. This is a big one. If you are rested and healthy, you will be better able to respond to the frustration of a balky loved one or an unhelpful doctor more rationally. You may feel the anger, but you won't have to express it.
  • Practice deep breathing. Taking three deep, cleansing breaths gives you some time to calm down and adds oxygen so that you can think clearly.
  • Self-talk. Have some soothing chants that you can use in a hurry: "It's okay." "Let it go." "He isn't doing this on purpose." "It's the disease, not my loved one."
  • Laugh. Step outside of the situation and see its absurdities and silliness.
  • Later, you can do your homework of putting angry feelings into words and looking for underlying feelings. This may make it easier to deal with future anger.
For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.


Friday, April 15, 2016

Conscious Choice and Gratitude

For the past few weeks, Geroge's caregiver, Mary, has been learning ways to decrease her situational depression by using her ability to make changes in the way she thinks and responds to her feelings. She's learned to talk and write about her feelings, good and bad. Last week, she learned to laugh more. This week, she is working on making conscious choices and being grateful.

One of the abilities that LBD takes away is that of being able to make choices. With LBD, what you feel is what you get. While it is still true that Mary will feel whatever comes up for her, she doesn't have to stay with it. She can make a conscious choice to change the way she views the situation and generate a more positive feeling. Conscious choices require thinking. They are different from the automatic reactions that are Mary's (and anyone's) first response, and George's only response, to a feeling. They also require the ability to initiate, something else LBD has stolen from George. But George can still follow, and so when Mary changes the way she responds to a negative feeling, George is often able to follow suit.

Making conscious choices. This ability to change one's view of the situation is especially important when Mary begins to feel overwhelmed and discouraged with her job as caregiver. Doing something for someone else can be very uplifting. However, Mary won't feel better about doing things for George if she feels she has to. Then each chore is just one more burden, one more step deeper into depression. But if Mary steps back and remembers that this is a job she chose, she will be able to deal with it better and her depression won't get worse.

Reaffirming past choices. Like many caregivers, Mary made a choice to be George's caregiver when he was diagnosed. "I don't want anyone else caring for my George. This is my job," she said. Of course, when the caring gets rough, it is easy to forget this. Therefore, Mary must consciously remind herself of that earlier choice. She might prefer to be on the cruise they had planned, but, of the choices available to her now, this IS the one she has chosen--and the one she chooses again now. Mary's conscious reminder gives her back a feeling of being in control. With this, her job feels less burdensome even though nothing else has changed. Then, because Mary is more positive, George's anxiety decreases and so do his symptoms.

Gratitude. Like making choices, gratitude requires conscious thinking. That is, Mary has to consciously choose to be grateful--it is not a reflex action. But when she does choose to feel grateful, it helps to unblock Mary's depression-suppressed production of the pleasure-enhancing chemical, dopamine. When Mary's gratitude is directed towards others, it triggers paths in her brain that increase her ability to enjoy other people, something else that depression suppresses. As with any feeling, it also works better when she puts what she is grateful about into words. Because it is a positive feeling, Mary can share her gratefulness with George and he will feel better too. Then, Mary reinforces this by writing about it in her diary.

The best part is that like laughter, gratitude doesn't have to have a reason. Just looking for something to be grateful about triggers the dopamine, and those pleasurable feelings. It also requires Mary to think about the positive aspects of her life which triggers the production of serotonin, another "feel-good" chemical. Mary has now added "the attitude of gratitude" to her routine, along with the laughter yoga she learned last week. Every day, she takes a few minutes to think about what she's grateful for. Even if the day has been awful and she can't think of a thing, the searching for it is enough to help. Of course, finding something is even better.

Of course, these techniques aren't the whole answer. Mary must still take care of herself in other ways like having enough help, getting enough exercise and maybe even talking to her doctor about antidepressants.

For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.

Friday, April 8, 2016

Using Humor and Laughter

Mary, George’s caregiver, is learning how to use the connections between feelings and thinking to decrease her bouts of situational depression. Last week, she learned about how talking about unpleasant events and giving names to negative emotions decreases their power. She also learned the talking about happy events made her feel even better…and that writing about both could also be helpful. She learned to do her work with the negative emotions away from George because he’d take it all personally, but to include him in her positive stuff because it would make him feel better too.

Mary is still working on using emotions to decrease her depression. This week, humor is the subject. Humor is a multi-part process:
  1. Something "funny" – “How do you stop an elephant from charging? Take away his credit card.” This joke contains something that doesn’t fit our preconceptions, and a resolution. Mary knows she can’t stop an elephant with a piece of plastic, but when she changes the meaning of the word “charge” then it works—and she laughs. Humor can also be simpler, or “slapstick.” Someone else gets a pie in the face, stumbles and falls, or gets embarrassed. Mary sees someone in one of these uncomfortable situations and laughs, mainly as a response to the relief that it's “not me.”
  2. Perception and understanding. Obviously, understanding the elephant joke requires thinking skills. That’s why George often doesn’t see the humor in things. But he still understands slapstick humor which requires less thinking.
  3. Appreciation: When Mary “gets” a joke, her brain rewards her with dopamine, which among other things, makes her happier. However, depression tends to attack the areas of the brain that secrete this neurotransmitter. Thus Mary may get the joke, but won’t be able to appreciate it. The good news is that if the joke is funny enough, other areas of the brain come into play to help the normal dopamine secreting centers overcome the blockage. George has PDD, the kind of Lewy body dementia that starts with Parkinson’s. With PD, Lewy bodies attack dopamine and so there is already a limited amount available. Thus, even if George understands the joke, it may not seem funny to him. His dopamine production isn’t blocked, it is depleted.
  4. Expression: Laughter and smiling require motor and language abilities that Mary has but George is losing. Depression seldom affects motor abilities. George’s PD does. He may be able to understand a joke and even appreciate it but have difficulty demonstrating that he can. Mary can watch for other non-verbal cues, like a thumbs-up signal.
  5. Better mood—and health. Laughter is healing. It stimulates Mary’s brain to secrete endorphins like serotonin which increase happiness and decrease depression. These chemicals also improve Mary’s general health by boosting the immune system. Finally, the very act of laughing brings more oxygen into Mary’s body and stimulates motion, stability and balance.

Now all of this may sound very complicated. But actually, there’s a shortcut. Mary can skip to step 4, and simply laugh. It doesn’t really matter what she laughs about. She can just laugh, laugh til her sides split. Her brain cannot differentiate between pretend and genuine laughter. And the more she laughs, the better she will feel.

Laughter is contagious and so if she does it with George, he’ll soon be laughing too…or doing his best to do so. Of course, Mary must be careful that George doesn’t think she is laughing at him. A good way to do this is to laugh at LEWY, and the problems IT causes…not George.

Mary has become a convert to “Laughter Yoga,” started in Florida in 1995 by Dr. Madan Katarina. It is a combination of clapping, breathing and laughing. Motion creates emotion. Breathing increases the oxygen in the blood. And laughter, well, we already know what it does!

Give Laughter Yoga a try—It’s easy and fun. You can do it in a group or at home, alone or with your loved one. It is almost too easy to be effective. But try it and see what you think.
  • Clap your hands in rhythm: One, Two -- One-Two-Three! (repeat 2 times--or more)
  • Now laugh in rhythm while you clap: "Ho, Ho — Ha-Ha-Ha!" (repeat 2 times--or more)
  • Expel all the air from your lungs and pretend you're smelling a flower." (Hold an imaginary flower to your nose and exhale and inhale several times…remember to breath out longer than you breath in to prevent hyperventilation.)
  • Now, laugh from your heart: Place your hands on your heart and laugh…and laugh.
  • Now, laugh like you don’t care:. Throw up your arms high and laugh even louder. And laugh and laugh.
I'll bet you feel better, happier, more energetic, less stressed.

There’s more! Next week, I have still more to share about making emotions work for you instead of against you.

For information about Lewy body disorders, read our books:
A Caregivers’ Guide to Lewy Body Dementia
Managing Cognitive Issues in Parkinson's and Lewy Body Dementia

Helen and James Whitworth are not doctors. As informed caregivers, they share the information here for educational purposes only. It should never be used instead of a physician's advice.